Sharing our story produces wonderful feelings. Among them catharsis, satisfaction and relief. Spilling our guts, releasing our emotional energy, it feels good.

Having a bond of trust and unconditional acceptance allows us to share freely and get things off our chests. Painful memories, joyous triumphs, feelings and opinions. No judgement, instead validation, positive regard, the certainty someone genuinely cares about us.

If we are privileged to have special people in our lives we can comfortably share with on a deep level that is a very good thing. Each of us gets to choose how close we let people get to us and those we do, how much of our story we reveal.

Some things we may feel would burden a person and some of us don’t have a person like this in our lives. A counselor can help cushion us if we’re falling, stay above water if we’re drowning. Unleash all we’ve been holding in or repressing.

They can provide us the emotional release, insight, or launching pad we’ve been seeking. They can help us think through situations, evaluate our options, and make decisions.

If we find ourselves sad, bitter, angry or suffering from any kind of mental unwellness relief is available, we can share our stories.

Sharing our memories with friends and strangers alike gives us pleasure in the relatedness and belonging this creates. Sharing our insight and wisdom with others is how we can change the world.

12 thoughts on “Tell Your Story

  1. traceyrawoot says:

    Love this! During this time especially, we need to share or to vent. I think its incredibly important to know you are not alone. The world is one. We are experiencing the same challenges and mental health is one of them

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, and thanks for your comment, agreed! 🙂

      Like

  2. JoAnna says:

    Having people we can trust with our story is important. If those people are hard to find, we can put ourselves in positive places and seek out positive people. When life’s challenges threatened to overwhelm me, a few good friends and my spirituality pulled me through. Sometimes it takes a while to determine if people are good for us. A counselor can certainly help with this process. In the meantime, we love ourselves.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Absolutely JoAnna. Thank you for sharing, I’m glad you pulled through and yes self love is so needed.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Rowena says:

    I’ve been through some monumental health challenges which has remain ongoing. This becomes challenging for most of us, because we don’t want to talk about these difficulties all the time or we’ll be in danger of becoming our disease, losing friends and not being rounded. However, there are periods when things become more acute when I need to talk more and a councellor is particularly useful then, but it’s good to have someone you’re already connected with so you don’t have to launch into your full story when you’re fragile. I would rather keep my friends and family away from my run of the mill dissatisfaction with my health issues and supplement with professional support during the worst. I also firmly believe in writing in a journal, although ideally you can share at least the gist of what’s in there with someone so you don’t end up with two mutually exclusive world running side-by-side. I was given the Diary of Anne Frank as a 13 year old. An interview with her father, Otto Frank, points out that he knew a very different girl. Here’s the link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AWRBinP7ans
    He’s very wise man.
    Best wishes,
    Rowena

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You’re among good company Rowena. Those are fears shared by many and that is a very good point, that it’s immensely helpful to already have that connection to somebody who knows our stories before things become so acute, but it’s especially important in such times we have the support we need. We are so resilient, even amidst states of fragility.
      I fully agree, journaling is very helpful, thank you fo sharing that video, it was very meaningful to watch, it offers a valuable commentary on our limitations in truly knowing people, and being aware of this perhaps can help us know them better. it’s so important for us to share our pain with someone so we don’t feel alone and so reassurance of hope can be stoked in our fireplaces. Often, it isn’t until we lose someone to suicide it dawns on us the depths of their suffering and what life was really like for them.
      Thanks for sharing 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Rowena says:

        Here in Australia, we have the R U Ok Day? This has given us a way of being able to approach those people we know aren’t okay in a less confrontationl manner. It also provides an opening for us to reach out to others and say: “I’m not okay.”
        Well, I was struggling about six months ago. Australia had the really horrific bushfires which all the world heard about and about the smoke. I am asthmatic and I have lung fibrosis relating to my autoimmune disease. I spent months cooped up at home and there were days where I was being kept alive by the air-conditioning that was filtering out the smoke. I told my husband I wasn’t okay and he didn’t respond. I didn’t say anything to him at the time. However, a few months later I approached him about it. He said, again on account of my ongoing health problems: “But you’re never okay”. That was true enough but I did tell him that I wasn’t okay beyond the usual not okay. I guess that’s also where the counsellor comes it handy. They’re on the look out for cues like that and would’ve run with it. My husband is also my carer and get very tired, especially when I’m not well and coughing all night. When that load is high in the home front, there’s no shame or feeling or betrayal or that you’re being let down if you need to call in reinforcements. Indeed, it makes good strategic sense.
        Brandon, I appreciate you opening up this difficult topic to discussion and I hope my experiences can help somebody because you can feel pretty alone at times, especially when your circumstances are quite rare, like my health issues, and you can just phone a friend in the same boat. However, i do have friends around the world with my disease and we link up via a FB support network. A favourite of mine: Never give up!
        Best wishes,
        Rowena

        Liked by 1 person

      2. That’s an awesome idea for a holiday, we should have that here in the states!
        I remember hearing about those fires, I’m sorry to hear about your suffering but I’m glad you’re hanging in there. Yeah seeing a counselor amidst difficult times should be as normal as seeing a doctor for health concerns.
        Of course, these kinds of topics I feel are important to bring to people’s awareness. Even if we already know, life can quickly take us out in a riptide where our memory and sense of mental diirection are thrown off. I’m glad you have that support, that is awesome. Nevs give up!
        Truly,
        Brandon

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Rowena says:

        I like what you say about life suddenly taking us out in a riptide, which is what’s happened with the coronavirus. We’ve been caught in quite a few riptides now, and so we’re somewhat resilient. We can see it as something that will pass as long as we take the necessary precautions to give us the best chance of being part of the “we” on the other side.
        It’s been interesting over the last couple of days because I’ve been finding the easing of restrictions stressful and difficult to navigate and I started to feel different to other people and particularly alone. I mentioned it a bit on my blog but not much else. On Saturday, a care package full of yummy snacks arrived from our niece and there’s this retired doctor from a church we used to go to who keeps touching base with me for somereason and he turned up yesterday. I’m a Christian and I very much feel that God has heard my silent cries and brought these people around me. I also found the courage to share a poem I’d written about it last week with my church home group and they were very encouraging. It actually meant the world to me that they asked to hear my poem. I am so used to hiding myself away from people in the physical world, despite opening up through blogging. I’ve ended up with a weird dichotomy there where people I’ve never met in real life could well know me better or differently to those closest to me. Thought you’d find that interesting.
        I’m enjoying our chats, Brandon and I’m hoping they reach people out there who haven’t quite got to the point of being able to put into words how they feel and give them a bit of courage and hope.
        Best wishes,
        Rowena

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Thank you Rowena, I appreciate your compliment. I agree about the current state and coronavirus as well as resiliency. Yeah many things are stressful and difficult to navigate right now I empathize with you completely, many people share your experience, social isolation taking its toll.

        I’m glad you have blogging as an outlet and a voice on here, you are a great writer, I enjoyed your latest article, that’s pretty cool you saw a pelican and those are beautiful pictures. what nice gestures of kindness. Very cool you had that cathartic experience full of so much meaningfulness. That is a phenomenon for sure that dichotomy and I can relate to that. having experienced it before. I do very much find it interesting, thank you for opening up.
        I’m enjoying them too Rowena and I share your hope in that 🙂
        Truly,
        Brandon

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Kingston Lim says:

    “Sharing our memories with friends and strangers alike gives us pleasure in the relatedness and belonging this creates.”

    Very true, story telling has been around since the dawn of humanity. From cavemen huddled around fires to FDRs fireside chats up until the modern information age, it’s part of what makes us human.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for your validating comment and sharing your observation Kingston. Absolutely 🙂

      Like

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